What is IST Bands and Gliders?

Uncategorized Jul 26, 2020
 
IST stands for Inner Strength Training. Building the body from the inside out. Description of my IST exercise philosophy at the end of this article. 
 
IST Bands and Gliders is built with the IST method in mind. It's an energetic class that will build your body strong and rev your body's metabolism to burn more calories throughout your day. 
 
This class incorporates standing Pilates moves and barre strengthening exercises with functional body weight training with cardio bursts making this a highly effective workout!
 
Bands and glider exercises are amazingly functional and gentle on the joints. We will be alternating between lower body exercises, upper body exercises, core exercises, and low impact to high impact cardio options.
 
All moves are assessable for all bodies and levels, so all levels are welcome! Work at your own level to gradually and safely perform the movements. 
 
Only equipment needed:
  • 6' resistance band
  • 12" mini loop...
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The Importance of Exercise Recovery: Step 4 De-Stress Techniques

 

Over the past several weeks I have been exploring methods of recovery. It’s not simply about resting the body after an exercise session, but about intelligently helping the body heal and functionally move to reach healthy balance within the body.

In the first post I explain there is a constant play of stability and mobility. Certain areas in our body function best when strong and stable and other parts of the body function best when flexible and mobile.

In the second post I explore how strength training helps build the body to function optimally. I highly recommend strength training with a plan designed by a certified personal trainer, as it’s important to have a solid program and system built to work with your unique set of strengths and weaknesses. More info about training here.

In the third post I delve into stretching and self-massage.

In today's post, I am exploring step four of six of my recommended recovery methods: ways to...

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The Importance of Recovery: Step 2 Stretching and Step 3 SMR

 

Over the past several weeks I have been exploring methods of recovery. It’s not simply about resting the body after an exercise session, but about intelligently helping the body heal and functionally move to reach healthy balance within the body.

In the first post I explain there is a constant play of stability and mobility. Certain areas in our body function best when strong and stable and other parts of the body function best when flexible and mobile.

In the second post I explore how strength training helps build the body to function optimally. I highly recommend strength training with a plan designed by a certified personal trainer, as it’s important to have a solid program and system built to work with your unique set of strengths and weaknesses. More info about training here.

In this post we are going to delve into stretching and self-massage, which is step two and three of my recommended list of recovery methods.

Certain parts of the body become tight as the...

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The Importance of Exercise Recovery: Step 1 Strength Training

 

Last week I wrote an article on exercise recovery and mentioned that within the body there is a constant play of stability and mobility. Certain areas in our body function best when strong and stable and other areas of the body function best with more range of motion. I also briefly explored how six practices can help your body recover from exercise. Each week I will explore the six in more detail. 

The first practice I list is strength training, which at first may seem like a funny activity to put in a list about ways to recover from exercise. And while strength training doesn’t directly help our bodies recover from bouts of exercise, what it does do is far more important. Strength training lays the foundation to building a highly functional body. In the end this helps your body perform optimally so that it eases the demands on the body when you exercise, so less recovery is needed.

Strength training develops better force-couple relationships, which in turn creates a...

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The Importance of Exercise Recovery

 

Exercise recovery is more than just resting after a workout. In this article I go over a few important practices that can help increase your body’s ability to recover from exercise.

Within the body there is a constant play of stability and mobility. Certain areas in our body function best when strong and stable and other parts of the body function best with more range of motion.

ACE Personal Trainer manual (5th Edition) has a helpful list locating key mobility and stability areas within the body’s kinetic chain: 

  • Glenohumeral (ball and socket joint where the top of the arm and the shoulder meet): mobility
  • Scapulothoracic (shoulder blade attachment to upper back): stability
  • Thoracic spine (upper back where ribs are): mobility
  • Lumber spine (lower back): stability
  • Hip (ball and socket joint where the top of the leg and side of pelvis meet): mobility
  • Knee: stability
  • Ankle: mobility
  • Foot: stability

If you have ever taken one of my classes, you may have heard me speak...

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What is the Pain-Free Movement?

As an experienced Pilates instructor, certified Exercise Coach and Corrective Exercise Specialist, many new clients have come to me with over-use injuries, even with a few acute injuries. While healing acute injuries is not within my scope of practice (that is the purpose of a medical doctor and a physiotherapist) I can help you prevent future injuries and work with your current chronic pain and over use injuries. 

Chronic injuries develop over time. They often develop from poor movement patterns. Patterns we have formed over years depending on the type of work we do, how many hours we sit in a day, how we walk and stand, and how we move our bodies with load (our bodyweight) and what trauma our bodies have experienced in the past. Every individual is unique with their own habitual movement patterns. 

However, it's guaranteed that if we don't work on fixing our patterns at a certain point incorrect movement patterns will cause pain, discomfort, and/or...

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Injuries

injury May 31, 2020

There are two categories of injuries: Acute and Chronic. 

Acute injuries happen from accidents causing muscle strains, corrective tissue sprains, cuts, and/or broken bones. Traumatic injuries are best treated immediately after the accident. 

Runner's First Aid: RICE

  • Rest: don't make the damaged area worse by putting more stress on it, however, resting doesn't mean immobility either. Moving the injured area is important because it stimulates blood flow to the injured tissue. Your health care provider will advise how to move the injured area properly.
  • Ice: swelling is part of the healing process, but too much of it slows down healing. Applying ice causes vasoconstriction of the local blood vessels which limits bleeding and swelling to the area. Icing the injured area reduces your recovery time (very important!). Apply ice for 20min and allow an hour in-between applications. Repeat for 24-72 hours. Never place the ice directly on skin, have a...
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What is Pre-habilitation?

fitness injury May 20, 2020

Pre-habilitation is a proactive approach to avoiding injury. Professional athletes know of its importance, but it is often the missing component in the exercise programs of recreational fitness enthusiasts.

All experts agree exercise is key to health and longevity. Exercise helps with:

  • reducing risk of chronic disease
  • lowering blood pressure
  • reducing excess weight
  • giving us more energy and strength
  • boosts our mood
  • increases health of skin
  • boosts brain activity and memory
  • helps with relaxation and sleep quality
  • helping lessen aches and pains

One of the biggest issues with starting an exercise routine is muscle imbalances and repetitive motion with incorrect form that often leads to injury. I see this quite often with new clients coming to me for advice.

With pre-habilitation, qualified trainers use specific exercises to strengthen vulnerable areas, while lengthening tight areas of the body to avoid injury. Each body is different, depending on its own set of habitual movement...

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How to Stay Motivated

fitness health running May 09, 2020

Staying motivated can definitely be much harder than initially starting an exercise plan. It’s just a fact of life. Starting a new habit and sticking to it is super hard. In this article, I am going to provide a few helpful tips to stay consistent with your habits so you can reach your health and fitness goals.

Just as we gradually train our bodies to develop strength and endurance, so need to do the same for our minds.

  • Think of yourself as an athlete. If you put effort into consistently working out you are by definition an athlete. Your goal may be to feel better, to look thinner, and have more energy, but in the end, you are an athlete. And if you put yourself in that mindset, psychologists say you’re more likely to act like an athlete. And athletes stick to their workout program regardless if they feel like it doing it or not.
  • If you have ever taken one of my classes you know I usually say “oohhh isn’t this so much fun?” or “wasn’t that...
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A Simple Method to Avoid Injury and Live Pain Free

fitness health Apr 26, 2020

Now that is an important topic we all are hoping for, eh? Now let’s see if I can deliver…

I am super passionate about this. I’ve been for quite a while. It’s always been a focus, but definitely since I had my rotator cuff (the muscles under and over your shoulder blades) injury back in August 2018. You can read about it on my blog here.

At the time, I read a book about shoulder injuries called Framework for the Shoulder and the author, Nicholas DiNubile, mentioned that once we are in our 40s the rotator cuff muscles have received so much wear and tear and with changes in our tissue composition as we age we are quite likely to injure those muscles. A bit disheartening I should say, but I wasn’t satisfied with that answer. Nope. My plan is to not experience that pain again.

Being a Corrective Exercise Specialist with the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) I knew exactly what happened. I was training 6 times a week with heavy weights with...

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